INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

"I had an interview at an (fast food chain) scheduled on Christmas day, I figured it would be closed so I emailed the manger to confirm. No reply, I showed up and it was closed. The interview was scheduled on their official website via chat bot. I tried to reschedule online and I have my in person interview this coming Tuesday instead. No phone interview, just had to answer some questions and fill out some forms. I'm scared that this is too good to be true, the whole thing is really weird. I haven't heard from a real person, what if I show up and don't have an interview and embarrass myself. I don't know what to do ah."

source: reddit

#intererviews #interviewhorrorstories #informedecisions

KEY KPIS FOR HIRING BIAS MONITORING

1. Number of potential biases monitored (i.e.: gender bias, ethnicity bias, academic institute bias, well-known companies bias) - the more potential biases you monitor the more chances for insights on how to improve your hiring process equity.

2. Bias score: - Create a scale that aggregates the data from all the biases
you are monitoring to provide insight into how biased or unbiased your
hiring process is. Track this metric over time to ensure your score increases
after applying relevant interventions.

#biasaudit #interviews #informedecisions

HOW TO GET STARTED WITH BIAS MONITORING IN YOUR HIRING PROCESS

Since bias/interview training is quickly forgotten, a better way to reduce human bias in your hiring process is to monitor it. To manage bias (or anything else), you need to measure it first.

How to get started:

1- Ensure your interviews are scored

Many scorecards today use emojis, star icons, and other visualizations to rate interviews. However, deriving data-driven insights from this valuable information can be challenging. Scoring your interviews provides the key to unlocking insights into bias.

2- Analyze and Audit for Bias

Once your interviews are scored, you can begin examining various biases, such as group differences. Are we assigning higher scores to non-diverse candidates compared to diverse candidates? To males versus females? Are higher scores given to candidates from Ivy League schools or well-known companies? Is there a correlation between the type or number of years of experience and interview scores? These analyses offer profound insights that foster a deep understanding of your organization's actions affecting diversity efforts.

#biasaudit #interviews #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

"I received an offer from a company that I interviewed with. I asked for some more in the compensation which was somewhat reasonable. After a day or two, HR said someone else (let’s call him John) wants to interview me again (I have spoken to John before.)

I did that interview again which went well.

I got a response from the hiring manager to my thank you email saying he was “all set” but was waiting for John to finish some interviews. John and hiring manager are same level.

Did I mess up the negotiations or is this normal procedure?"

source: reddit

#inteerviews #interviewhorrorstory #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

"In mid-August, I was approached by a small higher education program to apply for the position of dean. It would be a good fit for me, pay reasonably well, and be the logical next step in my career. I applied.

In early September I was invited for a zoom interview. It lasted two hours, and had great energy. I came out of it even more interested in the position than I had been before.

Three days later they called to invite me to fly to the campus (a couple states away) for a 24 hour in person visit and get to know the place and key personnel. It was tiring, but i think went really well. I was told then they were hoping to start the position in January.

A week after my campus visit, i got a thank you from the HR rep, sounding really positive. (I had also sent one to the committee).

A month later I was told they were still doing interviews, and now not going to make a decision till end of the year.

A month after that, told the same again.

At this point, I've basically given up on it, and assumed they weren't happy with something about the first round of interviews, despite how good it seemed to go."

source: reddit

#interviews #interviewhorrorstory #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

"Alright, get this: A while back, I was in the running for (huge corporate) grad program. Picture the scene: they herd us into solitary confinement, I mean, a room, and unleash this actor who's basically a verbal wrecking ball. The dude goes full Oscar-worthy performance, hurling insults, getting all up in our personal space, basically embodying every nightmare boss you've ever had. This goes on for an eternity (read: an hour). By the end, half of us are practically sobbing.

Now, with some time passed, I'm like, “What fresh dystopian HR hellscape was that?” Seriously, how did I, or any of us, sit there and think, “Yep, this is totally fine and normal”? It was like a twisted episode of Black Mirror, minus the cool tech.

Talk about a soul-crushing, dignity-stripping ordeal. Has anyone else been through this kind of bizarre, humiliating recruitment ceremony? Or is it just me who's been to this corporate Thunderdome?"

source: reddit

#interviews #interviewhorrorstory #informedecisions

THAT'S A DRIVEN RECRUITER FOR YOU

source: reddit

#sourcing #interviews #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

"I applied for a part-time role. They let me know that they cannot hire anyone working part time right now.

Why?? I applied for a specifically part-time role and specified my availability. I got invited to interview in person 3 days later, where the manager informed me that they cannot hire anyone part time and I was encouraged to apply in the future. wtf??"

source: reddit

#interviews #inteerviewhorrorstory #informedecisions

NOT PROVIDING REAL FEEDBACK TO CANDIDATES FOR FEAR OF LEGAL REPERCUSSIONS - INFORMED DECISIONS TAKE

NOT PROVIDING REAL FEEDBACK TO CANDIDATES FOR FEAR OF LEGAL REPERCUSSIONS - INFORMED DECISIONS TAKE

Thank you to everyone who participated in our survey where we asked how you feel about recruiters not providing genuine feedback to candidates for fear of getting sued.

Here is Informed Decisions take on this:

We strongly believe that you should definitely provide genuine and meaningful feedback to a rejected candidate.

We also believe that the chances of being sued actually go up if you don't do so.

Providing feedback to a rejected candidate shows respect for their time and investment in your process, and is a testament to the process's fairness and transparency. If a candidate is just rejected without a proper explanation, they are more likely to feel frustrated and not respected, thus will be more likely to sue.

We are highly convinced that if companies will analyze their candidate litigation cases, they will see that most rejected candidates did not receive any feedback.

The fact that there are many corporate recruiters who do provide genuine and detailed feedback to candidates, and also report the beneficial outcomes of such feedback on candidate experience shows that this is possible and has a personal motivation component to it. We at Informed Decisions believe that this should become a standard practice and that its benefits outweigh its costs.

#interviews #candidateexperience #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

One of my managers decided to freestyle an interview and ask candidates “If I invite you to a potluck, what are you bringing?”. The candidate said “mashed potatoes”.

Well, wasn’t that insightful into how they will perform as a Digital Marketing Specialist?

Source: the web

#interviews #bias #informedecisions