Bytes of Bias: Rite Aid's AI Misstep Leads to FTC-Enforced Ban

Rite Aid has been banned from using facial recognition technology for five years following a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) ruling. The decision comes after the FTC found that Rite Aid's AI system, used between 2012 and 2020, incorrectly identified consumers, especially women and people of color, as shoplifters. This led to various forms of harassment, including wrongful accusations, police confrontations, and public humiliation.

The FTC's complaint highlights Rite Aid's failure to implement safeguards against these harms. The technology produced numerous false positives, misidentifying individuals based on poor-quality images and inaccurate matches. The system was more prone to errors in stores located in predominantly Black and Asian communities.

As part of the settlement, Rite Aid must now establish comprehensive procedures to mitigate risks when using biometric data and discontinue any such technology if it cannot ensure consumer safety. The company is also required to enhance its information security program and comply with a 2010 Commission data security order, which it previously violated.

See link to full article in the first comment

#AI #bias #informedecisions

AI GENDER BIAS - EXAMPLE

Here is an example of CHAT-GPT gender bias.
Many thanks to @keith mcnulty for pointing this out and sharing some sample prompts

#AI #bias #informedecisions

INTERVIEW HORROR STORY

One of my managers decided to freestyle an interview and ask candidates “If I invite you to a potluck, what are you bringing?”. The candidate said “mashed potatoes”.

Well, wasn’t that insightful into how they will perform as a Digital Marketing Specialist?

Source: the web

#interviews #bias #informedecisions

THIS IS WHAT YOU GET FOR OVER-RELYING ON CREDENTIALS!

#interviews #bias #informedecisions

BIAS MONITORING - AN INNOVATIVE AND EFFECTIVE WAY TO REDUCE INTERVIEW BIAS

Bias training doesn't work, it's quickly forgotten, and interviewers default to their old, biased ways.

This is also supported by research (see link in 1st comment).

A better way to reduce human bias in your hiring process is to track it.

To manage bias (or anything else), you need to measure it first.

Stay tuned for our next posts where we will explain how to go about it!

#interviews #bias #informedecisions

DO STRUCTURED INTERVIEWS AND BIAS TRAINING REALLY WORK IN REDUCING BIAS IN THE HIRING PROCESS?

Over 100 years of research evidence has proven that structured interviews predict
job performance better than unstructured interviews and are fairer toward diverse
candidates. Bias training, on the other hand, is showing mixed results. The key
reason is that most information tends to be forgotten and people tend to revert to
their old ways of decision-making.

#dei #interviews #bias #informedecisions

WHAT EVERYONE IS DOING DO REDUCE BIAS IN THEIR HIRING PROCESS?

Thanks to everyone who participated in our survey 'What actions are you taking to reduce bias in your interview process'.

As it arises from the survey, most of you are practicing bias training, interview guides, and scorecards.

Bias training and structured interviews are gradually and steadily becoming a best practice, as organizations recognize their importance in promoting diversity in the hiring process.

By implementing interview guides and scorecards, companies provide a consistent and fair evaluation framework for all candidates. For instance, companies like Amazon and Facebook have adopted structured interview guides to standardize the interview process, ensuring that all candidates are assessed against the same set of criteria. These guides outline the questions and evaluation criteria that interviewers should follow, reducing the potential for bias and enabling a more objective assessment. Furthermore, organizations like IBM and LinkedIn have invested in unconscious bias training programs, educating their hiring teams on implicit biases that may affect decision-making.

But are these practices actually effective? What can you do as a talent leader to differentiate yourself and stay on top of the curve?

Stay tuned for my next post and check out the link below ↓

#dei #interviews #bias #informedecisions

EQUALITY VS. EQUITY IN JOB INTERVIEWS

We've all come across various visualizations showcasing the difference between equality and equity (here's another great one). However, how do these concepts translate to job interviews?

Equality

During the interview, all candidates are asked the same questions and evaluated for the same set of skills.

When making hiring decisions, all information provided (bio, skills, values, motivations, culture add) is weighed in the same manner for every candidate.

Equity

During the interview, adjustments are made to ensure that every candidate, regardless of their background or circumstances, has an equal opportunity to perform their best. For instance:

1. Language adaptations - If the interview is conducted in a language that isn't the candidate's native tongue, adding an interviewer who speaks the candidate's language or letting the candidate know at the outset of the interview that they can ask the interviewer to repeat questions or speak more slowly.

2. Avoiding questions that may create bias - It is widely known that it's illegal to ask candidates about their ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation. However, it's also inappropriate and intrusive to ask questions that skirt around these topics.

3. Modifying interviewers' communication style to be more inclusive of candidates from diverse cultures. This involves using clear and straightforward language, avoiding idioms and slang, and being mindful of different communication styles across cultures. Equality in the interview process sets a baseline that can be achieved through a structured interview and decision-making process. Though it may appear basic, many companies and interviewers conduct unstructured interviews and discussions that result in biased hiring. Equity is the standard that businesses should strive to uphold, and it begins with understanding interviewers' biases, providing them with actionable insights, and monitoring their progress over time. Whether you're aiming for equality or equity, the Informed Interview Intelligence Platform is here to help!

*Picture source: The World Forum

FIVE WAYS TO MAKE YOUR JOB INTERVIEWS MORE INCLUSIVE AND DIVERSE

Job interviews are a crucial part of the hiring process, but they can also perpetuate discrimination and bias if not handled properly.

Here are five ways to make your job interviews more inclusive and diverse:

1. Review the position’s description and requirements: Make sure that the language you use in your job description and requirements is gender-neutral and doesn't exclude any particular group of people.

2. Train your interviewers: Provide training to your interviewers on unconscious bias and cultural competency. This will help them avoid making assumptions about candidates based on their appearance, race, or background.

3. Create a structured interview process: Use a consistent set of questions for all candidates and avoid relying on the interviewer's gut feeling. This will help reduce bias and increase the diversity of your hiring.

4. Be mindful of your body language: Be aware of your nonverbal communication during the interview, including maintaining eye contact, smiling, and nodding when appropriate.

5. Encourage diversity in your recruitment process: Consider recruiting from a variety of sources and actively reach out to diverse communities. This will increase the diversity of your candidate pool and give you a better chance of hiring a diverse and inclusive team.

By implementing these strategies, you can create a more inclusive and diverse hiring process that will help you to find the best candidates for your organization.

Remember, diversity and inclusion are not only values, but also drives better performance and innovation.

WHY INCREASING DIVERSITY IN YOUR HIRING PIPELINE WILL NOT NECESSARILY RESULT IN MORE DIVERSE HIRES

Increasing diversity in your hiring pipeline is an important step in creating a more diverse and inclusive workforce, but it is not a guarantee that your hiring will become more diverse.

Here are several reasons why:

1. Unconscious bias: Even with a diverse candidate pool, unconscious bias can still play a role in the hiring process. Interviewers may unconsciously favor candidates who are similar to themselves or who fit a certain stereotype.

2. Lack of diversity in the decision-making process: If the decision-makers in the hiring process are more homogenous (in ethnicity, gender, perspectives), chances for hiring diverse candidates decrease, as they may apply stereotypes and not appreciate diverse candidates.

3. Lack of inclusion: Even if a diverse candidate is hired, they may not stay with the company if they do not feel welcomed and included. A company culture that is not inclusive or welcoming to diverse individuals can push out diverse hires and discourage diverse candidates from applying or accepting a job offer.

It's important to understand the goal is not to "check a box," but to create an equitable and inclusive hiring process and work environment where everyone can perform at their best.

Therefore, it is important to remember that increasing diversity in your hiring pipeline is only one step in creating a more diverse and inclusive workforce. It is crucial that you are tackling unconscious bias, promoting a culture of inclusion, and retaining diverse employees.